More Than 100000 People Hit City Streets For NYC Women's March

A second day of demonstrations in support of women's right got underway on Sunday, after protesters flooded the streets in cities across the world during the previous day to mark the anniversary of President Donald Trump 's inauguration.

Marches supporting of female empowerment, several of them massive, also took place on Saturday.

In New York City's Union Square, about 200 women and men gathered at a Feminism & Faith in Unity rally and march that added a religious twist to the many marches around the nation.

This year, attendees are hoping their voices can generate concrete action at the ballot box.

"I think a year ago was an outcry and now we're figuring out how to sustain change and make change in the longer term, which is harder", Murlas said. "It's really about electoral engagement in 2018".

Lisa Paz, 36, showed up in support of her mother, Alexis Jimenez, who is running for a seat in New Mexico's state Legislature.

Jade Byard Peek, a transgender woman of African-Nova Scotian and Mi'kmaq heritage, said she and others felt uncomfortable and under attack at last year's event. "So much is at stake, and women can make the difference for our children, our Dreamers, our environment and our economy".

Politics weren't the only thing on demonstrators' minds.

Afterward, a wave of women made a decision to run for elected office and the #MeToo movement against sexual misconduct became a cultural phenomenon. "I stood with fellow physicians, ready to demand change, and this year I stand in front of this crowd as a candidate because I decided, like so many of you, that enough is enough, and if we are the majority then we should look like it".

Madeleine Greenberg, an 18-year-old from Newport Beach, Calif., went to the march in New York with her three roommates from New York University. Nancy Isenberg, author of "White Trash", an expansive look at class in the US, said the working-class women she has studied are far more skeptical of claims of sexual harassment that do not involve violence.

"The fact that my daughter would grow up to be something that could be reduced to mere gruesome locker room talk by the type of man who could earn the presidency in this country".

Mulvaney on 2018 vs 2013 Shutdowns: Obama Wanted to 'Weaponize' Shutdown
Behind the scenes, however, leading Republicans and Democrats were trying to work out a compromise to avert a lengthy shutdown.

According to local media reports, organizers said some 300,000 people attended the rally in Chicago - far more than were expected.

"I think Donald Trump is just beyond [the pale]", said participant Kirsty Bin.

Her husband of 20 years Phil Murphy was sworn into office on Tuesday after winning the race for Governor of New Jersey.

Kari Whaley, 30, brought her 8-year-old son to Sunday's march in Orlando. Signs and shirts called for people to register to vote and head to the polls for the 2018 midterm elections.

Smaller marches also drew hundreds in Melbourne and Brisbane.

"Women are scared to speak and because I was vilified by everything I said, I was called a prostitute for being raped", she said at the rally.

The federal contractor said her community went into high gear a year ago.

Hollie S. Chambers marched in Miami, carrying a sign that said, "A woman's place is in the revolution!" She said that since last year's march, she has met with senators and representatives, organized her neighbors, and gone to dozens of protests. "I recently moved to Florida from NJ", Chambers said, "and wanted to get started in advocacy in my new community".

Yet organizers said they were putting aside their divisions, even as some groups disagree over who can claim the mantle of the Women's March.

"It's a time where we're not just showing up - folks are saying that, 'Hey, we actually need to be sitting in those chairs, '" Robinson said.

"Unprecedented success for our Country, in so many ways, since the Election".

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