Top Democrat seeks to interview Ivanka Trump in Russian Federation probe

President Donald Trump on Wednesday morning again labeled the probe into potential coordination between his associates and Russian Federation the "single greatest witch hunt" in USA history.

Trump and aides said Democrats and other critics are using Russia as excuse for Hillary Clinton's loss in the 2016 election, and unfairly trying to tie the president to Russians who hacked Democratic emails and promoted "fake news" about Clinton.

Trump tried to throw fuel on that disagreement, calling Feinstein "sneaky" in a tweet the next day and saying Republicans should regain control of the investigation. "Republicans should finally take control!"

The assessment from the committee's top Democrat underscores the partisan impasse that has plagued the House investigation, with Nunes and House Republicans now focusing on investigating allegations of improper FBI conduct during the 2016 elections and over its Russia probe - while Democrats demand a deeper dive into whether there was any Trump campaign collusion with the Russians.

Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, fired back Thursday.

While denying collusion with Russia, Trump's tweets did not mention another aspect of an investigation led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller: Claims the president sought to obstruct of justice in the Russia investigation by firing FBI Director James Comey in May. South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy became the committee's chairman and said he would leave the investigating to Mueller.

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Trump also would not commit to an interview with Robert Mueller.

Schiff placed the blame largely on Republican Devin Nunes, saying the GOP chairman of the committee - who stepped aside from running the investigation for much of previous year - has blocked dozens of requests for witnesses and subpoenas, with the support of House Speaker Paul Ryan. But a push to pass that legislation has faded as Republicans say they are less concerned that Trump will try to oust Mueller. The Senate panel's interviews are performed by staff. But his investigation has already resulted in Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, pleading guilty to lying to the FBI about conversations with Russia's ambassador. The path of the Senate Judiciary Committee is uncertain as Feinstein and Grassley have disagreed on the focus of the probe.

"There is collusion, but it's really with the Democrats and the Russians far more than it is with the Republicans and Russians".

"Every single witness we've interviewed has been consistent on what they have testified to", he said. "There are witnesses who have knowledge of the Trump Tower meeting and what it was about who have not been brought to our committee - and need to".

Mueller has also tentatively set a trial date in May for former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort, who was indicted in October on charges, including money-laundering conspiracy, related to his lobbying work on behalf of a Russia-friendly Ukrainian political party.

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