First Rohingya family returns to Myanmar after conflicts

UN Security Council envoys to visit Bangladesh Myanmar

First Rohingya family returns to Myanmar after conflicts

A boat carrying 70 Rohingya Muslims set out for Malaysia from Myanmar this week, two sources and a rights group said, the latest to embark on a risky sea journey.

The UN chief said the assaults were allegedly perpetrated by the Myanmar Armed Forces, known as the Tatmadaw, "at times acting in concert with local militias, in the course of military "clearance" operations in October 2016 and August 2017".

Rights groups are expressing scepticism over the announcement that Myanmar has repatriated the first Rohingya family, despite warnings from the UN. The United States government and the United Nations describe the violence against the Rohingya as "ethnic cleansing".

According to a Myanmar government statement posted late Saturday, one family of refugees became the first to be processed in newly built reception centres earlier in the day. After months of delays, five members of a Rohingya family on Thursday went back to Rakhine.

Burma has strongly denied that allegation - saying the army had waged a legitimate operation against insurgent Rohingya militants who had attacked more than two dozen police posts and an army base in August.

Images accompanying the social media post on Saturday showed five individuals receiving identification cards - which do not grant citizenship - from uniformed Myanmar officials, and getting medical help and living provisions from health and social workers.

The UNHCR also urged the Myanmar Government to immediately provide full and unhindered access to refugees places of origin in Rakhine, which would enable it to assess the situation and provide information to refugees about conditions in the places of origin, as well as to monitor any possible future return and reintegration of refugees.

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One irresponsible teacher with a gun can lead to the deaths of many students. "It's a business, and they've proven it again". She called the decision to end the walkout "bittersweet". "That is a tool to have if we have nothing else", he explained.

Andrea Giorgetta from the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) criticised the repatriation announcement as "a public relations exercise in an attempt to deflect attention from the need for accountability for crimes committed in Rakhine state".

Most Burmese consider the Rohingya as unwanted immigrants from Bangladesh, and the army refers to them as "Bengalis".

Many have refused to take part in repatriation until they receive guarantees about their rights and citizenship.

Many Rohingya refugees say they fear returning to a country where they saw their relatives murdered by soldiers and where Buddhist vigilantes drove them from their homes.

During the visit, Win announced that Myanmar is ready for the repatriation of Rohingya.

Doctors Without Borders says the violence claimed at least 6,700 Rohingya lives in the first month alone.

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