Theresa May faces British MPs over Syria strikes

GETTYUp to four Tornado GR4 aircrafts were used in the attack

GETTYUp to four Tornado GR4 aircrafts were used in the attack

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May attends a press conference in 10 Downing Street, London, April 14, 2018.

International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt opposed calls from MPs including Mr Corbyn - who has called for a War Powers Act - to give Parliament greater powers over military interventions.

QUESTION OF TIMINGJohnson said May and her cabinet of top ministers had to move quickly on Syria, so could not risk recalling parliament from its holiday break, and added that there were plenty of examples of when a prime minister did not get its approval.

By launching strikes without prior approval from parliament, May dispensed with a non-binding constitutional convention dating back to the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

May's personal rating remains comfortably ahead of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn - 46 per cent to 25 per cent, with 29 per cent don't knows.

Corbyn later wrote to May seeking assurance that there would be no further bombing raids and urged the government to negotiate a pause in the Syrian civil war.

Stop the War, a coalition once chaired by Corbyn, held a demonstration outside parliament on Monday afternoon.

When asked what would happen in the event of further chemical attacks, May said she would be willing to order further airstrikes against Syria, refusing to commit to consulting parliament beforehand. However, that has been less the case in recent years.

David Cameron, who was prime minister in 2013, tweeted on Saturday: "As we have seen in the past, inaction has its consequences".

Ahmet Uzumcu, director-general of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, said Monday that the organization's team "has not yet deployed to Douma", two days after arriving in Syria.

Saturday's attacks, which came in response to a suspected chemical attack on the former rebel stronghold of Douma on April 7, targeted the sites near Damascus as well as in the province of Homs.

It returns from its break on Monday, when May will face MPs' questions on the strikes.

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"But it is my responsibility as prime minister to make these decisions and I will make them".

"I believe that parliament should have been consulted and voted on the matter".

The UK joined forces with the United States and France to bombard three suspected chemical weapons production facilities on Saturday.

She spent the evening calling world leaders, including key regional figures such as Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman, King Abdullah of Jordan, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, to explain why she had ordered British military involvement in the US-led strikes. It shows a weak Government putting short term political expediency before democracy and in so doing further diminishing the standing of Britain in the world.

The Green Party, which has one MP, said May had "trampled over parliamentary democracy" and demanded a vote in the House of Commons on the strikes.

DUP leader Arlene Foster said the airstrikes were "limited but proportionate and justified".

The Prime Minister spent Saturday evening speaking to world leaders to explain why Britain had joined forces with France and the USA and will insist the three nations are "not alone" in believing it was the "right thing to do".

It is in our national interest to prevent the further use of chemical weapons in Syria - and to uphold and defend the global consensus that these weapons should not be used.

We can not tolerate the trivialisation of the use of chemical weapons, which is an immediate danger for the Syrian people and for our collective security.

The British prime minister has faced criticism for her failure to seek prior parliamentary authorisation for Britain's participation in the bombardment, alongside the United States and France. Click any of these buttons below!

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