Google shoots Chrome 66's silencer after developer backlash

Google rolls back autoplay ban in Chrome 66 after borking web-based games

Chrome is getting too clever for some

Numerous commenters suggest the Chrome team allow users to opt in instead of enabling the feature by default.

While the feature was obviously aimed at web pages with ads and auto-playing videos, it had an unforeseen side-effect of also muting HTML5 and JavaScript-based games.

Google says the policy will once again be applied to the Web Audio API in October, and that developers have until that point to update the code in their web-based games and apps according to Google's developer guidelines.

Google has pushed an update to Chrome that essentially rolls back an unpopular policy change from last week that automatically muted audio for auto-playing web-based apps, including many HTML 5 based games and art projects. "We've updated Chrome 66 to temporarily remove the auto-play policy for the Web", wrote Google Chrome Engineer Abdul Syed in a blog post, publishing a list of changes.

Other comments call for a response from the Chrome development team, particularly with regard to suggestions for modifying the policy to indicate when audio is being disabled, and to enable users to easily switch it back on, either temporarily or permanently.

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While the move should restore sound to affected sites for now, there are still unhappy developers out there.

The autoplay-video blocker is created to fix one of the greatest problems of the Internet: autoplaying videos on websites.

By automatically pausing Web Audio objects when a webpage is launched, the update earlier this month was meant to help silence ads that seemingly begin barking at you when you visit some sites. This change does not affect most media playback on the web, as the autoplay policy will remain in effect for video and audio . Unless web developers scramble to use the Web Audio API instead of those tags, Chrome should continue to save your ears from unwanted and potentially obnoxious noises while you browse.

The Chrome team said that the changes will not impact the web browser's new feature of silencing Internet videos and audio that have an autoplay feature.

As per a report in The Verge, a developer named Ashley Gullen had revealed the ways to fix the issue, but Pallett has said that it is a "non-trivial user interface challenge".

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