Here’s What Phil Mickelson Said Regarding His Actions At U.S. Open

With Saturday's breach of etiquette there's a small stain on Phil Mickelson's legacy

With Saturday's breach of etiquette there's a small stain on Phil Mickelson's legacy

In doing so, Mickelson incurred a two-shot penalty, which he claimed was better than what he could have run up had he let the ball run off the green.

"I know this should've come sooner, but it's taken me a few days to calm down", it reportedly said. He says: "My anger and frustration got the best of me last weekend".

Dave Shedloski of GolfWorld shared a message from Mickelson, who said he's embarrassed and disappointed for what happened on the course at Shinnecock Hills. I'm sorry you're taking it that way.

It was certainly not his finest moment, but the contrition will likely turn the tide for many.

American golfer Phil Mickelson loses the plot at the US Open when he putts a moving ball.

"I don't mean disrespect by anybody", Mickelson told Fox after his round on Saturday. "I'll gladly take my 2 strokes and move on".

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The latest comments from Mickelson, however, suggest his actions - which many critics felt bent the usual etiquette and spirit of the game -were more of an impulse rather than the calculated use of the rule book. In that situation I was just going back and forth. The USGA stood by the two-shot penalty and Mickelson contacted USGA executive director Mike Davis and offered to withdraw.

The United States Golf Association (USGA) gave Mickelson a two-stroke penalty instead of disqualifying him.

However, as the criticism intensified, with Jason Day, the former world No1, hinting on Tuesday that he should have been shown the gates, Mickelson and his team might have believed he had no choice.

"It's been on the golf course, players complaining, Phil [Mickelson], and you never really want that because it's such a hard thing to do to win a major".

"That's where we clarified that, 'Phil, you actually made a stroke at a moving ball, and so we have to apply that rule.' That's different than if he had deliberately just stopped the ball or whacked it in another direction or something like that".

The Englishman told Omnisport: "He was making a statement that, "This is ridiculous and I'm going to show you how ridiculous this is". So it's just, it's us applying the rules".

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