Ivanka Trump tweets Chinese proverb believed to be American

White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump arrives prior to a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump an Japan's Prime Minist

White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump arrives prior to a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump an Japan's Prime Minist

Ivanka Trump left the Chinese baffled on Monday when she tweeted what she labeled a "Chinese proverb"- one that the Chinese weren't too familiar with, The Washington Post reported.

Asian Twitter couldn't resist having a little fun after reading an Ivanka Trump tweet that she described as a "Chinese Proverb".

Confucius says Ivanka Trump made a proverbial social media gaffe.

Soon after the Chinese were on the case, American social media users had grabbed hold of this new meme with delight. According to the website, a Chicago periodical in 1903 published an article that read in part, "Things move along so rapidly nowadays that people saying: 'It can't be done, ' are always being interrupted by somebody doing it".

As first daughter and a senior adviser to her father, Ivanka has frequently emphasised her connection to China and Chinese culture.

The president's elder daughter fired off a celebratory message hours ahead of his historic summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un.

They also offered some snarky commentary, including one person who said, "Don't mistake something as a Chinese proverb simply because it's written in Chinese characters".

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Trump said the global leaders left the G-7 meeting in good spirits, and said he had agreed to sign the meeting's summary document. President Trump , meanwhile, was not as kind, accusing Trudeau of "false statements" in a tweet.

The quote Ivanka invoked on Tuesday has also been attributed to non-Chinese sages like George Bernard Shaw, the Irish playwright.

"[My editor] really can't think of what exactly this proverb is. Please help!" the news account of Sina, the company that operates popular microblogging platform Weibo, posted.

She hired a Chinese-speaking nanny to tutor her daughter.

As you would expect, Twitter users have jumped at the chance to mock the 36-year-old mother-of-three, with Chinese literature scholar Brendan O'Kane tweeting: "You can call any old sh*t a Chinese proverb on the internet".

Bill Kristol, editor of the U.S. political magazine the Weekly Standard, tweeted a guess that the phrase "seems in fact to be American from the turn of the 20th c. - which makes sense, since its spirit is can-do Americanism".

She also wrongly attributed a quote to Albert Einstein in July a year ago, writing: "If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts".

"Why are Trump WH aides giving our proverbs to China, increasing our proverb deficit?"

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