Kerber reaches final as Ostapenko self-destructs

Görges suffered five consecutive first-round defeats at Wimbledon before this year

Görges suffered five consecutive first-round defeats at Wimbledon before this yearGERRY PENNY EPA

The old adage of feel your way in to a match and start solidly does not appear to apply to Ostapenko who put together a insane sequence to start her first Wimbledon semi-final.

Williams and Kerber faced off in the Wimbledon final in 2016, where Williams beat Kerber 7-5, 6-3.

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In each set Goerges was broken in the sixth game and she simply did not have the firepower or belief to stop the seven-times champion from surging to a 20th successive win on the hallowed turf.

Serena Williams advanced to her 10th Wimbledon final after easing past Julia Goerges and will get a shot at equalling Margaret Court's all-time Grand Slam record.

But this is uncharted territory for Goerges, who was in her first Grand Slam semi-final after losing in the first round on her five previous visits to Wimbledon.

The 23-time major victor is just one title short of matching the legendary Australian's haul of Slam title and she will contest the final at the All England Club for the chance to match her.

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He added: "It's time now to hold our heads high as a nation and be proud of each other". It has a slightly different feel for me, but it's nice to hear people enjoying it again.

"These are the matches I was working for as a young kid", Kerber said, "and to stand here again in the final at Wimbledon is great".

The left-handed Kerber was mainly a passive participant in the early going against Ostapenko.

However, the 14 errors meant that Kerber, at the third attempt, broke to lead 4-3.

Eventually, Kerber's style ruled the day.

The Latvian stuck to her guns, continuing to go all out at the start of the second set, but her radar was way off and Kerber quickly opened up a 3-0 lead, with one break of serve. By the time she flubbed a backhand while falling behind 5-1 in the second, she dropped her racket and screamed.

The final tally told the story: Ostapenko had far more winners, 30-10, but also far more unforced errors, 36-7.

Kerber looked anxious and Ostapenko had a point to close to within a game but she dumped a backhand return into net and then coughed up two more errors to hand Kerber victory. But unlike in the quarterfinals, when she needed seven match points to win, this time it required only two, with the match ending - fittingly enough - on a forehand by Ostapenko that sailed wide.

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