PayPal wrote to customer her death is a breach of its rules

PayPal sent the letter seen below to Lindsay and Howard Durdle

PayPal apologises for telling widower his wife’s death was a breach of its rules

While he had contacted the company to let them know so they could close out her account, providing them with everything they had asked for including her death certificate, her will, and his identification, he was shocked when a letter arrived addressed to her at their Bucklebury, West Berkshire, residence.

Per the BBC, after 37-year-old United Kingdom woman Lindsay Durdle died of breast cancer that had spread to her lungs and brain on May 31st, 2018, her husband Howard Durdle says he provided Paypal with documentation including "her death certificate, her will and his ID, as requested".

PayPal likes to get paid, even if you're dead.

This photo of Lindsay and Howard Durdle was taken past year.

"You are in breach of condition 15.4 (c) of your agreement with PayPal Credit as we have received notice that you are deceased... this breach is not capable of remedy", it went on to read. When she died, there was an outstanding balance on her PayPal account of £3,200 (US$4,240).

Later the firm apologised to her widower after acknowledging the letter as "insensitive" and begun inquiry into how it came to be sent.

We are not required to give any further notice before taking such action, however we do understand that you may be experiencing financial difficulties and are eager to help.

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Noting that "this breach is not capable of remedy", the U.S. firm, which operates a worldwide online payments system, threatened to take action after July 20 to collect the full payment for the outstanding balance.

Durdle told the news agency that while he was "in a reasonable place at the moment", he is a member of Widowed and Young charity and "seen first-hand in there how a letter like this or something like it can completely derail somebody".

The firm has also written off any outstanding debt in the meantime.

The odd thing here is that it doesn't seem like a mistaken template or a case of misunderstanding: the letter makes it clear that PayPal knew that Ms Durdle had passed away, and yet the letter was sent anyway.

"We apologise unreservedly to Mr Durdle for the understandable distress this letter has caused", the company said in a statement to TNW.

He added that PayPal had told him it would not be able to share the cause behind the letter's mailing because it was an "internal matter".

"We are urgently looking into this matter, and are in direct contact with Mr Durdle to support him".

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