Uber, Lyft suspend driver who secretly recorded passengers

Jason Gargac made about $3,500 from live-streaming nearly 700 rides for viewers to comment upon

Jason Gargac made about $3,500 from live-streaming nearly 700 rides for viewers to comment upon

Meanwhile, an audience would comment on their appearances and conversations.

Some of the videos also revealed passengers' names and addresses.

"I try to capture the natural interactions between myself and the passengers - what a Lyft and Uber ride actually is", he told the newspaper.

But the Post-Dispatch article raised questions about Gargac's actions from privacy and ethical perspectives, and Uber and Lyft, which he also drove for, condemned his actions.

It's a pretty sketchy thing to do - sketchy enough to get Gargac deactivated from Uber and Lyft. "The safety and comfort of the Lyft community is our top priority", it said.

On Saturday morning, Gargac tweeted that to him, "transparency is always key".

An Uber driver in Missouri has been suspended after it emerged that he had been live-streaming hundreds of his passengers on Twitch for months without them even knowing. "I've done that", he added, "for now".

This story originally appeared in the New York Post. Gargac told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that he was forced to create on-screen graphics to prevent his viewers from selectively clipping or editing out short clips. He started driving in order to record and broadcast people.

Local newspaper the St. Louis Post-Dispatch said passengers were seen kissing, vomiting and gossiping about relatives and work colleagues.

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CNET reached out to Uber and Lyft for comment but did not receive an immediate reply. They have come under scrutiny for the oversight of their drivers, which they consider independent contractors and not employees.

"It's a fact-by-fact case", Pate said, "and I don't think there have been any court decisions to deal with this particular issue". "This is, 'How can I monetize passengers as content?'"

Uber said Monday it has ended its relationship with Gargac.

"When these laws were drafted and enacted, I don't think any of these states could have envisioned what we have in this case, where you have livestreaming video", he said. "You may not have violated the law, but people certainly feel violated".

"We're really dealing with a law that was developed just during the time of audio recording", Stewart said.

Dempsey said recording is common practice as a safety measure for drivers, but there's a fine line that these drivers cross.

The ride-hailing companies disclaim liability for drivers actions in their terms of service, and riders waive their rights to sue when using the services, Stewart said.

"This is creepy", one Twitch user posted, according to the Post-Dispatch, which watched dozens of hours of Gargac's channel on the video streaming service. But Twitch's community guidelines expressly prohibit content that violates a person's privacy.

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