Democrats Frighten Manafort Jurors

Microphones are set up in front of the Albert V. Bryan United States Courthouse as the jury begins deliberation in the trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort

Democrats Frighten Manafort Jurors

He said that he needed the protection of U.S. Marshals because of his involvement in the trial.

"Of course, jurors are instructed to ignore all outside information about the case they are deliberating. I don't feel right if I release their names".

The president didn't give an answer when asked if he is prepared to pardon Manafort, a veteran lobbyist who joined Trump's campaign team in March 2016 and spent three months as Trump's campaign chairman until mid August of that year. A spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Service did not immediately comment.

"I've received criticism and threats".

Ellis also denied the media's request to make sealed sidebar transcripts public, although he added that much of those transcripts will be made public after the trial.

He echoed those remarks after the jury sent Ellis a note Friday asking to end deliberations at 5 p.m. ET because one juror has an event.

Prosecutors said Manafort owned and controlled 31 foreign accounts and that more than $60 million flowed through them from 2010 to 2014. On the first day of testimony, Trump said Manafort had been treated worse than 1920s gangster Al Capone. If word about Trump's comments gets out to a member of the jury, which has not been sequestered, there's "great risk of prejudicing the jury". Asonye "turned to the reporter with a smile", the Times reports, and said, "Sorry, I can't talk to you".

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Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman. If convicted on all the charges, he could spend the rest of his life in prison.

Many legal analysts wonder if Manafort will eventually enter into an agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel's investigation as a means to reduce charges or to minimize a potential sentencing that he may have to eventually face.

Manafort's trial in federal court in Alexandria is the first stemming from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's 15-month-old investigation of Russia's role in the 2016 US election.

The judge's revelations came as Mr Trump called Mr Manafort a "very good person".

A Manafort conviction would allow Democrats and Mueller's supporters to say ending the investigation would be premature.

They also alleged that Manafort had lied to banks in order to take out more than $20 million in loans after his Ukrainian political work dried up in 2015, and they accused him of hiding the foreign bank accounts from federal authorities.

Manafort's attorneys didn't call witnesses in his defence, claiming the prosecution had failed to meet its burden of proof.

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