Perseid meteor shower peaks Saturday, Sunday nights

The Perseid meteors

The Perseid meteors Credit Danny Lawson PA

However, the Perseids meteor shower is so bright that it is actually visible through lightly polluted skies.

The Perseid meteor shower is usually active every year from July 23 until August 24, while its peak will be between Saturday evening and Sunday dawn. The Backyard Astronomer Gary Boyle anticipates we will see as many as 100 "shooting stars" per hour.

And in some places, a sky free from clouds will not automatically mean a good view for the meteors.

Around this time every year, Earth ventures into the wake of an ancient comet called Swift-Tuttle, which leaves behind trillions of particles.

However, many more photographs will come this weekend when the Perseid meteor shower peaks. "Moon is to set at 7.12pm Doha time", the expert added.

You'll need to get away from city lights and move to a low-lit area. According to Space.com, this year's peak will be visible both the nights of August 11-12 and August 12-13.

A shooting star is seen on the night sky during the perseid meteor shower in Jankowo near Poznan in 2016
A shooting star is seen on the night sky during the perseid meteor shower in Jankowo near Poznan in 2016 Credit LUKASZ OGRODOWCZYK

The shower that we see from Earth is the little bits of ice and dust - that are usually no bigger than a pea - hitting the Earth's atmosphere at a staggering 134,000 miles per hour.

Allow about 45 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark. The meteors, it's said, rain like sparks from his blade.

Some meteors could appear streaking across the sky for several seconds, leaving a trail of glowing smoke in their wake.

One such person is Paul Jacobs, who photographed some stunning images of the Perseid meteors over the beach at Lee-on-the-Solent in Hampshire.

As long as it's a clear night, the meteors will be visible to the naked eye. According to NASA's website, this weekend promises dark nights due to diminished moonlight from the new moon, bringing "some of the better skies" to view the cosmic spectacle.

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