Honey ‘smacked’: CDC links salmonella outbreak to Kellogg’s Honey Smacks

Recalled Honey Smacks still for sale Salmonella outbreak continues to grow
By Coral Beach

Recalled Honey Smacks still for sale Salmonella outbreak continues to grow By Coral Beach

On Tuesday, the CDC stressed that retailers are not legally allowed to sell any Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal and that customers should not buy or eat the potentially tainted cereal. Tennessee is included in that list.

Illnesses in this outbreak started on dates ranging from Mar 3 to Aug 7, CDC said, adding the investigation is still ongoing. The BEST if Used By Date can be found on the top of the cereal box, and the UPC code can be found on the bottom of the box.

"Retailers can not legally offer the cereal for sale and consumers should not purchase Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal", the agency said.

Public health officials are asking consumers who see Honey Smacks for sale to immediately contact the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their region.

Consumers should check their homes and throw away any Honey Smacks cereal.

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FDA reports that recalled Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal is still being sold in some locations, despite the recall earlier this summer. "The FDA continues to collect information to determine any additional sources". The U.S. outbreak updates do not indicate whether there have been any illnesses in foreign countries.

Honey Smacks are not safe to eat. "The FDA has come aware that recalled Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal is still being offered for sale". It's is an oval-shaped, sweetened puffed wheat cereal with a golden brown color.

Anyone who has eaten Honey Smacks cereal and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Symptoms usually appear within 12 to 72 hours of eating food contaminated with the bacteria. By June 14, the CDC said 73 people had contracted salmonella across 31 states.

While most people recover within a week, some illnesses can last longer and be very severe, especially in young children, older adults, and people with compromised immune systems.

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