New Reports Add Detail To Disappearance Of Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi

Hatice Cengiz, the Turkish fiancée of missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi and her friends wait in front of the Saudi consulate in Istanbul Turkey

15 suspects, video footage offer new clues in case of missing Saudi reporter

A United Nations human rights expert has said the investigation into the disappearance of a Saudi journalist in Turkey "should not be politicized", insisting the case has created a dilemma for the Turkish government.

Khashoggi had written a series of columns for the Washington Post that were critical of Saudi Arabia's assertive Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who has led a widely publicized drive to reform the Sunni monarchy but has also presided over the arrests of activists and businessmen.

Khashoggi had sought to become a USA citizen after living in self-imposed exile since previous year, fearing repercussions for his criticism of the prince, Cengiz wrote.

The surveillance image bore a date and time stamp, as well as a Turkish caption bearing Mr. Khashoggi's name and that he was arriving at the consulate.

He reportedly told friends that he had been treated "very warmly" on his first visit and reassured them that he would not face any problems.

At 5:32 p.m., cameras show Khashoggi's fiancée, Hatice Cengiz, outside the police barricades of the consulate, speaking into her cellphone.

The revelation comes amid a claim that the Saudi team that flew to Turkey brought with it a bone saw to dismember Khashoggi.

The release of the photographs and video raises pressure on Saudi Arabia a week after Khashoggi disappeared during a visit to the consulate. But they have not provided definitive evidence to prove this.

Trump on Monday expressed concern about Khashoggi's case and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called for a thorough investigation.

15 suspects, video footage offer new clues in case of missing Saudi reporter

The details surrounding Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi's disappearance after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week remain a mystery, but according to a new report from the Post, U.S. intelligence officials seemed to have discovered a plan to capture him before it happened, and failed to successfully intervene.

Turkish media on Wednesday published images of a 15-member "assassination squad" allegedly sent to kill dissident Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi arriving in Istanbul and of a black van traveling from the Saudi Consulate to the consul's home. The report added that most of the men stayed at the Wyndham Grand Hotel and Movenpick Hotel, both located close to the consulate.

The rest of the suspected agents are reported to have arrived later that day on a second private jet or on commercial flights.

CCTV footage broadcast by Turkish TV appears to show groups of Saudi men entering the country via Istanbul airport and then checking in to the hotels.

At 1:14 p.m., Khashoggi is seen walking into the consulate, wearing a dark blazer and light pants.

One of the vans is reported to have taken some of the men from the consulate to the nearby residence of the Saudi consul about two hours after Mr Khashoggi's arrival. The video ends with shots of two private jets, saying that six men left at 5:40 p.m. and seven left at 9 p.m.

The security sources told TRT World that the "hit squad" took CCTV footage from the Saudi consulate in Istanbul with them when they left Turkey.

Before Khashoggi disappeared, U.S. intelligence intercepted communications of Saudi officials discussing a plan to grab him, the Washington Post reported.

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