NVIDIA officially unveils its flagship Titan RTX GPU

NVIDIA officially unveils its flagship Titan RTX GPU

Nvidia Titan RTX: 130 TFLOPS of deep learning performance

The flagship GPU takes aim at AI researchers and data scientists, rather than gamers; Nvidia claims the card "transforms the PC into a supercomputer" allowing faster training and inference of neural networks and enables researchers to experiment with larger neural networks and data sets.

Nvidia has launched the recently teased Titan RTX, which it variously refers to as "The Titan of Turing" and "T-Rex".

The Titan RTX (also known as the T-Rex) is the successor of the Titan V and has twice the RAM and bandwidth of the previous gen, as well as the RTX 2080 Ti which dropped this past September.

Over the weekend Nvidia has been indulging in a social media marketing campaign to get tongues a wagging about an upcoming RTX Titan graphics card. The Titan RTX packs 72 Turing RT Cores, delivering up to 11 GigaRays per second of real-time ray-tracing performance, just a notch above the 2080 Ti. Nvidia this morning confirmed that the Titan RTX would be part of its ray tracing accelerated GPU lineup, and it comes at quite the price: $4000.

NVIDIA officially unveils its flagship Titan RTX GPU

Finally, content creators will be glad to know that the Titan RTX will facilitate real-time 8K video recording.

576 multi-precision Turing Tensor Cores, offering up to 130 teraflops of deep learning performance.

The card also includes 24GB of GDDR6 memory - non-ECC, naturally - running at an effective 7,000MHz on a 384-bit bus for 672GB/s of bandwidth. Of particular interest for data scientists will be the fact that the Titan RTX supports RAPIDS, the open-source libraries that integrate with popular data science workflows to boost machine learning use cases.

On paper, then, it looks like the Titan RTX will be a very solid performer, but we'll have to wait until we get our hands on one to see if it justifies that incredibly high price tag.

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