New emojis feature inter-racial couples, people with disabilities and a sloth

New emojis feature inter-racial couples, people with disabilities and a sloth

New emojis feature inter-racial couples, people with disabilities and a sloth

Android and iOS users are getting a ton of new emojis (230 to be precise), which means you'll soon be able to express yourself in more ways than you ever thought possible.

The new period emoji and the other 58 additions will be released in the second half of 2019.

In addition, the 2019 list includes two people holding hands that can be modified with a range of gender and skin tone options. This follows complaints by Apple that very few emojis spoke to the experience of people with disabilities. Unicode also added four additional symbols that weren't in Apple's original proposal: standalone characters for probing cane, mechanized and manual wheelchairs, as well as a gender-inclusive "deaf person" emoji.

Elizabeth Warren Identified Herself As 'American Indian' On Texas Bar Registration
Moreover, Trump said he would pledge $1 million to the senator's favorite charity if the DNA tests proved her alleged heritage. The test showed that Warren has an Indigenous segment in her DNA, but her ancestry may stretch back as far as 10 generations.

Emojis are small graphics and smiley faces you can send with your keyboard and incorporate in messages and online text.

The introduction of dozens of new accessibility-themed emojis has been welcomed by disability rights campaigners. "The new emoji typically start showing up on mobile phones in September/October - some platforms may release them earlier", the California-based Unicode Consortium announced on Wednesday.

While the vote decided menstruation should be represented with an emoji that was a pair of underwear marked with blood, that idea was rejected by the Unicode Consortium. Other highlights include a superior looking otter, a guide dog and a bemused orangutan. There's also a touch more religious diversity, as mentioned above, with both a hindu temple and diya lamp emoji. The idea was first introduced by Plan International UK, a girl's right charity that held a survey on what a period emoji should look like.

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